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在线翻译:
szdaily -> CHTF Special
Wearables popular, but lack diversity
     2014-November-20  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Luo Songsong

    songsongluo@126.com

    LI JIXIN, manager of Shenzhen-based UVU Technology, didn’t anticipate that wearable devices would be so popular at the 16th China High-Tech Fair, saying he had run out of all his business cards on the first day, after which he gulped down some medicine to deal with losing his voice.

    Li wasn’t alone among wearable device exhibitors. According to International Data Corp., the number of wearable devices sold around the world stood at 19 million pieces this year. They project that to hit 112 million by 2018. And Nextmarket, a market research firm, says that will skyrocket to 373 million by 2020. By then, smartwatches will account for about 60 percent of the wearable devices market.

    Despite all the interest, some weren’t pleased by the lack of diversity. “The exhibited devices are mostly smartwatches, wristbands and glasses. So far, I haven’t seen any breakthroughs,” said Zhang Wei, director of Junsan Capital.

    Almost all the wearable devices exhibited at the fair are developed to monitor people’s fitness levels, sleep statistics or to act as smartphones. They are being sold for prices ranging from 200 yuan (US$33) to 2,500 yuan.

    Some devices are made to appeal to children and some to the fashion crowd. The Swiss Digital showcased a diamond-plated pendant that can synchronize call reminders and messages and control cameras remotely.

    “Some devices are cool and fun to have, but only for a short time. The must-have products should target the aging population for preventive health management,” said Paul Harris, CEO of UVU Technology, which will begin to sell its products in North America around Christmas time.

    Guo Peng, senior manager of Qualcomm, said a successful wearable device should be thin, light and fashionable, with a long standby time. Meanwhile, it should be able to connect to the Internet and collect user’s information anytime and anywhere.

    Zhang Guoxin, director of the Shenzhen-based Micro & Nano Institute, said homogeneity is a common phenomenon in the industry. “Some key technologies like sensors and Bluetooth are not being developed to an advanced level in China, which could hamper the industry’s progress,” he said.

    “The most urgent thing is to set up standards in the industry since every area of the market, like Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, power management and wireless charging — have separate international standards,” he said.

    Zhang said China has allocated 120 billion yuan to support the development of the semiconductor industry.

    Lei Bo from Guangzhou-based Bosma, which developed a smart thermometer for children, said it is more difficult to get an official permit to sell medical equipment, but that tougher regulations are good in the long run.

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