-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Movies
Logan
    2017-March-3  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    《金刚狼3:殊死一战》

    Starring: Hugh Jackman, Dafne Keen, Patrick Stewart, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, Richard E. Grant

    Director: James Mangold

    THE final Wolverine movie to star Hugh Jackman is a dark, mournful, bloody affair — but that fresh coat of gloomy paint doesn’t do enough to enliven the character, the X-Men universe or comic-book films in general.

    Set in 2029, Logan finds Wolverine (Jackman), also known as Logan, hiding out with an ailing Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) and another mutant, Caliban (Stephen Merchant), to avoid humans who are looking to wipe out the last of the X-Men. Not surprisingly, Logan has no interest in the outside world, but he reluctantly agrees to help a young girl, Laura (Dafne Keen), who is being hunted by mysterious soldiers as she tries to make her way to a legendary safe house for mutants.

    Directed and co-written by James Mangold, who also helmed “The Wolverine,” “Logan” drapes itself in the pitiless, widescreen aura of the Western. Not only does Logan make explicit reference to “Shane,” the film borrows the genre’s self-critical eye, questioning our need to mythologize heroes.

    Initially, the ultra-violent, almost post-apocalyptic approach is refreshingly visceral, giving us a Wolverine who swears, drinks and tears through his adversaries with animalistic ferocity. Likewise, Mangold doesn’t shy away from the story’s darker textures: Xavier is close to death, the idealism of his mutant academy is long gone, and Logan can’t regenerate as easily as when he was younger. In this way, the mortality-obsessed Logan also recalls the Western — particularly, the focus on an aging gunslinger eyeing his final shootout.

    But Logan’s air of self-important weariness, though expertly captured by cinematographer John Mathieson and production designer Francois Audouy, is at the service of a generic tale of a proverbial lone wolf who allows himself to care one more time. It’s innocent, nearly mute Laura who opens Logan’s heart, and Keen has a sweet face that belies the viciousness that Laura unleashes once we learn that she has the same lethal claws and fighting skill as Wolverine. However her character mostly feels like a done-to-death dramatic device that conveniently sets up a tender father-daughter dynamic that Logan first rejects but inevitably embraces.

    Likewise, Logan’s umpteenth struggle with his mutant identity — something that Jackman has been exploring on screen regularly since 2000’s X”-Men” — simply doesn’t have any novelty anymore, despite the actor’s reliably soulful turn and Logan’s despairing tone. This notion of introducing more “realistic” comic-book characters — a trope attempted with several superhero franchises — proves especially ineffective here since the filmmakers have given us a more vulgar, bloodthirsty Wolverine without offering comparable depth or a sense of how haunted he is by the pain he’s experienced.

    The problems extend to Logan’s villains. Richard E. Grant makes for a rather ho-hum evil geneticist who wants to clone the X-Men’s DNA, while Boyd Holbrook is unimpressive as a somewhat-flamboyant killer. Logan unveils another, surprise bad guy about halfway through, but even this twist underwhelms, leaving our faltering hero without a worthy enemy for this climatic cinematic showdown. If this, indeed, is Jackman’s final ride in the saddle, then Logan ends up with some of the same fundamental strengths and weaknesses of the earlier Wolverine standalone films: he’s a charismatic, indestructible figure who’s more thrilling than the movie that contains him.

    The movie is now being screened in Shenzhen. (SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn