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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth
Top presidential candidate would review THAAD process: advisers
    2017-March-21  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    THE liberal South Korean politician most likely to become the country’s next president would, if elected, review how the government would deploy an advanced U.S. missile defense system and would consult China, two of his top advisers said Friday.

    If Moon Jae-in, front-runner for the May 9 presidential election, reverses policy on the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system, it will place him at odds with the United States, South Korea’s biggest ally.

    The conservative government of impeached president Park Geun-hye agreed to deploy the THAAD to guard against attack by North Korea, but the decision sparked outrage in China, which reportedly responded with restrictions on some companies doing business with and in South Korea.

    China has repeatedly reiterated its opposition to the deployment of a US missile shield in the ROK, saying that it goes against efforts to maintain peace and stability in the Korean Peninsula.

    Moon would likely “do a review of the validity of the decision,” Choi Jong-kun, an adviser to Moon on foreign policy told Reuters. “While doing it, he will consult with the United States, as well as China.”

    “At the end of the day, if the reality unfolds in a way that South Korea’s national security and the economy were damaged because of the THAAD, not because of the North Korea issue, then it’s not really a rational situation, is it?”

    The comments are at variance with a tough stance taken by the new U.S. administration on North Korea.

    U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, visiting Seoul for the first time since taking office, said Friday a U.S. policy of “strategic patience” with North Korea has ended and military action would be “on the table” if North Korea took action to threaten South Korean and U.S. forces.

    Tillerson also said he expected the next South Korean government would “continue to be supportive” of THAAD.

    A Pentagon spokesman said THAAD deployment was “a critical measure” to defend South Koreans and U.S. forces against North Korean missiles.

    China is South Korea’s largest trading partner and the dispute over THAAD has left shopping districts in Seoul devoid of their usual crowds of Chinese tourists.

    Beijing has denied the restrictions are linked to the THAAD deployment.

    (SD-Agencies)

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