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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
The Shack
    2017-March-29  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

   

 《小屋》

    Based on William Paul Young’s book, this film directed by Stuart Hazeldine tells the story of a sad man counseled* by God. It stars Sam Worthington and Octavia Spencer.

    Mackenzie Phillips (Worthington) is a married father of three in Oregon. Mack is depressed* when he receives a mysterious* note inviting him to the mountain shack where his youngest daughter, Missy (Amelie Eve), was murdered after being abducted* during a camping trip. The note is signed “Papa,” as his wife, Nan (Radha Mitchell), likes to call God. Nan, we’re told in the voiceover* narration by Mack’s neighbor Willie (Tim McGraw), has a strong and abiding* relationship with God.

    In the depths of winter, the uninhabited shack still bears the stains of Missy’s blood. But before long the suicidal* Mack finds himself welcomed into a sun-washed valley. Filled with ferns, spring flowers and chirping birds, it has a Disney-cartoon sheen* and is occupied by the Holy Trinity: Spencer’s biscuit-baking, African-American “Papa,” the Middle Eastern carpenter Jesus (Avraham Aviv Alush) and Sarayu (Japanese pop star Sumire), a spirit of creativity in the form of an Asian woman who gardens and collects tears in delicate little bottles.

    Determined to heal Mack and resolve his doubts about God’s love, the Trinity are infinitely kind and patient.

    The film interweaves the homespun* cliches of Willie’s narration around the main event: a series of colloquies that tackle timeless questions about the nature of evil, the power of forgiveness and humankind’s place in the universe.

    The view of a personal God as a gender-fluid shape-shifter (Graham Greene appears as a male version of Papa) will be inspiring to some, terrible to others. The same goes for the multicultural Trinity.

    The film challenges narrow conceptions of what a Christian looks or sounds like. It’s not the film’s ideas that are its problem, but the heavy-handed literalness* with which they’re explored.

    The movie’s only truly affecting encounter is a brief, direct exchange between Mack and his older daughter, Kate (Megan Charpentier), who has been struck by pain and self blame over Missy’s death.

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