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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
Japan voters split on revising pacifist constitution: poll
    2017-May-4  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

VOTERS in Japan are deeply divided over Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s campaign to revise its 70-year-old pacifist constitution, according to a poll released yesterday, against a backdrop of growing tension in the region, particularly over North Korea.

The Nikkei Inc/TV Tokyo survey, published on the anniversary of the constitution’s enactment, showed support growing for Abe’s push to revise a charter written by the United States after Japan’s defeat in World War II and never amended.

About 46 percent of respondents favored keeping the constitution as it is, four percentage points lower than a similar poll last year.

The number favoring a change stood at 45 percent, up five percentage points from a year ago.

Under the constitution’s Article Nine, Japan forever renounced its right to wage war, leaving it open to interpretation whether it should maintain forces and how they could be used.

Successive governments have interpreted the constitution as allowing a military for “self-defense” only, and Japanese troops have taken part in international peace-keeping operations, as well as a noncombat reconstruction mission in Iraq during 2004-2006.

Abe, in a video message to a gathering celebrating the charter’s anniversary, proposed making explicit reference to the existence of the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) in the constitution, Kyodo News reported.

In March, Abe’s Liberal Democrat ruling party formally proposed that the government consider acquiring the capability to strike enemy bases.

(SD-Agencies)

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