-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business
Crushing blow to soy processors as Chinese grow wary on GMO
    2017-May-4  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

A CONSUMER backlash against genetically modified crops is beginning to dent demand for soybean oil, China’s main cooking oil, and could spell crisis for the multi-billion-dollar crushing industry, which depends on genetically modified soybeans from the United States and elsewhere.

Soybean oil sales account for about 36 percent of cooking oils used in Chinese kitchens, more than three times the next highest, and most of it is made from imported soybeans, which are nearly all genetically modified.

A Nielsen survey last year showed about 70 percent of consumers in China limited or avoided at least some foods or ingredients, compared with a global average of 64 percent, with 57 percent naming genetically modified organism (GMO) as undesirable.

That sentiment is already hurting retail sales. Supermarket sales of soybean oil fell 1 percent last year to 35.7 billion yuan (US$5.19 billion), data from Euromonitor shows, versus growth of between 2 and 6 percent for alternatives.

“Non-GMO oil is gradually replacing (soybean oil),” said Johnny An, supply chain director at food service firm Aramark, which serves meals to banks, government offices and schools in more than 60 Chinese cities.

A few years ago, 10 to 20 percent of Aramark’s customers asked for GMO-free oil, he said. Now it’s more than half.

The mood is causing headaches for crushers, said Paul Burke, Asian director at the U.S. Soybean Export Council, forcing them to find new markets for their soybean oil, though it had not yet had a noticeable impact on soybean imports, as demand for soybean meal used for animal feed, the larger byproduct of soybean crush, is still robust as China expands its livestock industry.

The Nielsen survey found that more than four in five Chinese shoppers would be prepared to pay more for GMO-free products, and a 5-liter bottle of GMO-free soybean oil already sells at a 20 percent premium to GMO oil.

China is the world’s top soybean oil consumer — it will use 16 million tons this year — but the crushers rely on the United States and Brazil, which grow genetically modified soybeans, for 86 percent of China’s 84 million tons of soybean imports.

(SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn