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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
S. Korea’s leader willing to visit North
    2017-May-11  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

NEW South Korean President Moon Jae-in said as he took office yesterday that he was open to visiting rival North Korea under the right conditions to talk about Pyongyang’s aggressive pursuit of nuclear-tipped missiles.

Moon’s softer stance on North Korea could create friction with Washington, which has swung from threats of military action to hints of dialogue as it seeks to formulate a policy under President Donald Trump.

South Korea’s first liberal leader in a decade, Moon also said he’ll “sincerely negotiate” with the United States, Seoul’s top ally, and China, South Korea’s top trading partner, over the contentious deployment of an advanced U.S. missile-defense system, THAAD, in southern South Korea. Moon has made a campaign vow to reconsider THAAD.

Chinese President Xi Jinping congratulated Moon on his election as president. China attaches great importance to its relations with South Korea and is willing to work with South Korea to jointly safeguard the hard-earned achievements in bilateral relations, Xi stressed.

In a speech at the National Assembly, Moon pledged to work for peace on the Korean Peninsula amid growing worry over the North’s expanding nuclear weapons and missiles program.

“I will quickly move to solve the crisis in national security. I am willing to go anywhere for the peace of the Korean Peninsula — if needed, I will fly immediately to Washington. I will go to Beijing and I will go to Tokyo. If the conditions shape up, I will go to Pyongyang,” Moon said.

Moon assumed presidential duties early in the morning after the National Election Commission finished counting Tuesday’s votes and declared him winner of the special election necessitated by the ousting of conservative Park Geun-hye, whose downfall and jailing on corruption charges is one of the most turbulent stretches in the nation’s recent political history.

At his first news conference at the presidential Blue House, Moon introduced his nominees for prime minister, the country’s spy chief and his presidential chief of staff. The usual circumstances of the election and immediate transition into office meant Moon inherited several officials from Park’s government, and he has moved quickly to replace them.

The nomination of Lee Nak-yon as prime minister was seen as an attempt to get more support from the southwestern liberal stronghold where Lee had served as governor and lawmaker. Lawmakers must approve Lee for the country’s No. 2 job, which was largely a ceremonial post before Park’s removal made current Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn a government caretaker.

Moon’s pick for National Intelligence Service (NIS) chief is Suh Hoon, a longtime intelligence official Moon said would be the right man to push reforms at NIS, which has long been accused of meddling in domestic politics. The NIS nomination does not require lawmakers’ approval, although Suh must first go through a National Assembly hearing.

Talking to reporters, Suh endorsed Moon’s call for a summit meeting with North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un, although saying it would be difficult for such a meeting to take place soon, considering the tension over the North’s nuclear program.(SD-Xinhua)

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