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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
Man, 22, thwarted global cyberattack
    2017-May-15  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    A 22-YEAR-OLD British computer geek emerged as an accidental hero whose good fortune and better instincts halted a crippling global cyberattack.

    The anonymous web savior was vacationing at his home in southwest England on Friday when he spent US$10.69 to buy an Internet domain name.

    It turned out the site improbably held the kill switch that neutralized the massive malware strike.

    “We had in fact prevented the spread of the ransomware and prevented it ransoming any new computer since the registration of the domain,” he wrote in a Saturday blog post about his unlikely triumph.

    The fast-spreading malware infected 104 countries, inflicting its worst damage across England and Russia before abating Saturday once the off button was flipped.

    More than 126,000 ransomware infections were reported by security software maker Avast, with roughly 60 percent of the incidents in Russia.

    British cyber-officials were working around the clock after the malware crippled its National Health Service, throwing everything from office visits to ambulance calls and chemotherapy treatments into chaos.

    Authorities had yet to identify who was responsible for the hacking incident, which has been deemed the biggest of its kind ever. The malware locked up computers while demanding a US$300 to US$600 ransom, payable in Bitcoin.

    Europol, the European Union’s police agency, was working with the victimized countries in a hunt for the perpetrators.

    The Friday attack “will require a complex international investigation to identify the culprits,” according to a Europol statement.

    The infected computers are likely beyond repair, although researchers hope to decrypt infected devices or recover victims’ files before a deadline today.

    The United States apparently largely dodged the mess because the hackers initially targeted Europe, giving American spam filters sufficient time to identify the threat.

    Experts believe the termination option was probably hidden in the malware, or perhaps left in by mistake. And they warn that future attacks could prove far more devastating.

    Microsoft responded to the attack by announcing it would make free security fixes available for older Windows systems to prevent a recurrence of the mess that followed Friday’s hacking. The attack struck Windows computers that had not installed patches released by Microsoft in March. (SD-Agencies)

 

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