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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
生肉、熟肉
    2017-May-16  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Meaning:

“生” means “raw,” “熟” is the opposite, meaning “cooked,” and “肉” refers to “meat.” Chinese netizens creatively use these two terms to refer to movies, animations, TV shows and other videos in foreign languages they can access online. Those with Chinese subtitles are “cooked meat,” while those without Chinese subtitles are “raw meat.” On such websites as acfun.cn and bilibili.com, there are a lot of videos posted immediately after they are aired abroad and not yet translated by fansubbers. This slang usage perhaps originated with Japanese adult videos, where people see a lot of flesh.

Example:

A: 你怎么在看印度片,还是生肉?

Nǐ zěnme zài kàn yìndù piān, hái shì shēngròu?

How come you’re watching an Indian movie without subtitles?

B: 这个是《巴霍巴利王》下,最新的,上集在视频网站有熟肉。

Zhègè shì 《bāhuòbālì wáng》 xià, zuìxīn de, shàngjí zài shìpín wǎngzhàn yǒu shúròu。

This is the “Baahubali 2: The Conclusion,” the newest Indian blockbuster. The first installment has an official subtitled version on streaming sites.

 

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