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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
AAC recognizes contemporary artists, scholars
    2017-May-30  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Debra Li

debra_lidan@163.com

THE Award of Art of China (AAC), one of China’s most influential art awards, held its 11th annual award ceremony in Beijing last week to honor the most influential figures and publications of 2016.

Geng Jianyi, who views art as a means questioning the world around him, was named 2016’s AAC Artist of the Year.

The jury chose Geng for the award because of his breakthroughs in the past year, as demonstrated by his solo exhibition “Stubborn Image.”

Held at OCAT Shanghai between September and November 2016, the solo explored ideas around “non-artworks.” To that end, the museum’s two main galleries were remodeled into winding corridors, with lamps and flashlights installed onto concrete pillars. Small-scale objects were used to project equally diminutive films — abstract in style, and oftentimes comprised of rotating images of insects and leaves. Together with the labyrinth-like space, the exhibit aimed “to provoke the viewer’s reflection on the liaison between everyday life, time, entirety and isolation.”

A recipient of a Lifetime Contribution Award at the 2012 Chinese Contemporary Art Awards (CCAA), Geng’s place in China’s art world has been firmly established. Renowned art museums like London’s Tate Modern have even featured his works.

Born in 1962 in Zhengzhou, central China’s Henan Province, Geng graduated in 1985 from the oil painting department of Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (now China Academy of Art). He, together with Zhang Peili, Song Ling and others, founded one of the mainland’s first conceptual art groups, Pond Society, in Hangzhou in 1986.

While a health issue kept Geng from attending the award ceremony at Jianfu Palace in the Forbidden City last Tuesday, Zhang accepted the award for his friend.

“If I had not studied art, I would not observe life the way I do today and my life would have been much emptier. That’s why I am full of gratitude for art,” Geng told the audience via video.

Hao Jingban, a female artist born in Shanxi Province in North China, received the Young Artist of the Year Award.

Having graduated in 2010 with a master’s degree in film from University College London, Hao represents one of two different approaches taken by young Chinese artists. Some of them focus on personal experiences and emotions, while for Hao, the film is not merely a form of expression but also a research method reflecting history and reality. Her works serve as historical documents as they provide new ways to understand and penetrate reality through the reconstruction of images.

Between June and August last year, the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art (UCCA) presented her solo exhibition “New Directions: Hao Jingban.” Focusing on two seemingly disparate spaces — Beijing ballrooms and Shanxi factories — the project took Hao three years to complete.

For the former, she created a four-channel video installation where documentary images, classic movie clips and texts on the evolution of Beijing’s ballroom scene coalesce in a polyphonic dialogue. In the latter, the artist tracked workers from the factories where her father and grandfather had once worked. Through both ballrooms and factories — key sites of work, entertainment and social interaction in the 20th century — Hao captured with great sensitivity situations and behaviors that can stand in as the symbols of an era.

Wang Tiantian, a friend, accepted the award for the artist who was in France at the time. Hao expressed thanks to those who supported her via video and said she hopes to contribute more to art exchanges between China and other countries in the future.

The Publication of the Year Award was given to “An Exhibition About Exhibitions: Displaying Contemporary Art in the 1990s” by art historian and curator Wu Hong. The book, with precious file photos and from a reliable author, will be helpful for contemporary art fans and researchers, according to the jury.

Headed by veteran art scholar Zheng Shengtian, this year’s nine-member jury included Eugene Wang, Jane DeBevoise, Karen Smith, Keith Wallace, David Joselit, Zhu Qingsheng, Lu Mingjun and Wang Huangsheng.

Wan Jie, chairman of Shenzhen-based Artron Group, said his company will select 100 artists from candidates and awardees of the AAC and publish an e-book featuring their works and exhibitions. The book will be given for free to universities as well as schools in less developed areas.

The AAC was established in 2006 by Artron.net.

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Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn