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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business
Small reactors eyed for nuclear edge
    2017-June-20  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

CHINA is betting on new, small-scale nuclear reactor designs that could be used in isolated regions, on ships and even aircraft as part of an ambitious plan to wrest control of the global nuclear market.

Within weeks, State-owned China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC) is set to launch a small modular reactor (SMR) dubbed the “Nimble Dragon” with a pilot plant on the island province of Hainan, according to company officials.

Unlike new large scale reactors that cost upward of US$10 billion per unit and need large safety zones, SMRs create less toxic waste and can be built in a single factory.

A little bigger than a bus and able to be transported by truck, SMRs could eventually cost less than a tenth the price of conventional reactors, developers predict.

The global nuclear industry will require around US$80 billion in annual investment over the coming decade as countries strive to meet climate and clean energy goals, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) forecasts, and China is keen to get its hands on a substantial chunk of any new business.

“Small-scale reactors are a new trend in the international development of nuclear power — they are safer and they can be used more flexibly,” said Chen Hua, vice president of the China Nuclear New Energy Corp., a subsidiary of CNNC.

China is now racing the likes of Russia, Argentina and the United States to commercialize SMRs, which include passive cooling features to improve safety.

The challenges of financing and building large, expensive reactors contributed to the bankruptcy of Toshiba Inc.’s nuclear unit, Westinghouse, and to the financial problems that forced France’s Areva to restructure.

SMRs have capacity of less than 300 megawatts (MW) — enough to power around 200,000 homes — compared to at least 1 gigawatt (GW) for standard reactors.

China is aiming to lift domestic nuclear capacity to 200 GW by 2030, up from 35 GW at the end of March, but its ambitions are global.

CNNC designed the Linglong, or “Nimble Dragon” to complement its larger Hualong or “China Dragon” reactor and has been in discussions with Pakistan, Iran, Britain, Indonesia, Mongolia, Brazil, Egypt and Canada as potential partners.

“The big reactor is the Hualong One, the small reactor is the Linglong One — many countries intend to cooperate with CNNC’s ‘two dragons going out to sea,’” said Yu Peigen, vice president of CNNC.(SD-Agencies)

 

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