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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
Cars 3
    2017-June-21  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

The third movie of the series looks to the winning formula of humor, heart and action (along with an added dose of Route 66-informed nostalgia*) that made the 2006 original such a sweet ride.

Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson), the pride of Rust-eze, returns front-and-center to pole position only to discover a new generation of sleek, state-of-the-art vehicles nipping at his wheels*.

He finally proves no match for one of them — Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer), who takes Lightning’s title and forces him to reconsider his racing future, especially when his longtime sponsor has been purchased by the smarmy* Sterling (Nathan Fillion), who views McQueen’s retirement as a merchandise-branding gold mine.

After seeking solace* back in Radiator Springs, where he’s spurred on* by the words of his gruff* late mentor, Doc Hudson (the late Paul Newman, in flashbacks), as well as by girlfriend Sally (Bonnie Hunt) and loyal tow-truck pal Mater (Larry the Cable Guy), McQueen agrees to hi-tech rehab with some guidance from race technician Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo).

Taking the wheel from John Lasseter, who directed the first two films, Brian Fee, who served as a storyboard artist on both, takes a leisurely, unhurried approach to the pacing, which, while agreeably allowing emphasis on character over action, occasionally gets stuck in neutral*.

As in the first film, the themes of youth vs. old age and change vs. heritage* once again play an important role in the script, which does a nice job keeping the warmly regarded original characters (although in much smaller roles) while introducing engaging new ones — most notably Alonzo’s spunky* Cruz.

Like its predecessors, the film is visually quite splendid and, especially for an animated feature, stirringly well lit, most notably in a racing sequence set along a photo-realistic beach during golden hour and another on a vividly moonlit night.(SD-Agencies)

 

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