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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business
Pork demand hits a peak
    2017-June-22  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

FROZEN dumpling makers in China are finding there’s a quick route to winning new sales — increase the vegetable content, and cut down on the meat.

This departure from traditional pork-rich dumplings is a hit with busy, young urbanites, trying to reduce the fat in diets often heavy on fast food.

“They like to try to eat more healthy products once a week or fortnight. It’s a big trend for mainland consumers, especially those aged 20 to 35,” said Ellis Wang, Shanghai-based marketing manager at U.S. food giant General Mills, which owns top dumpling brand Wanchai Ferry.

For pig farmers in China and abroad, it is a difficult trend to stomach. The producers and other market experts had expected the growth to continue until at least 2026.

Chinese hog farmers are on a building spree, constructing huge modern farms to capture a bigger share of the world’s biggest pork market, while leading producers overseas have been changing the way they raise their pigs to meet Chinese standards for imports. Some have, for example, stopped using growth hormones banned in China.

China still consumes a lot more meat than any other country. People will eat about 74 million tons of pork, beef and poultry this year, around twice as much as the United States, according to U.S. agriculture department estimates. More than half of that is pork and for foreign producers it has been a big growth market, especially for Western-style packaged meats.

But pork demand has hit a ceiling, well ahead of most official forecasts. Sales of pork have now fallen for the past three years, according to data from research firm Euromonitor. Last year they hit three-year lows of 40.85 million tons from 42.49 million tons in 2014, and Euromonitor predicts they will also fall slightly in 2017.

Chinese hog prices are down around 25 percent since January, even though official numbers suggest supply is lower compared with last year.

Since China began opening-up in the late 1970s, pork demand expanded by an average 5.7 percent every year, until 2014 as the booming economy allowed hundreds of millions of people to afford to eat meat more often.

Now, growing concerns about obesity and heart health reshape shopping habits too, fueling sales of everything from avocados to fruit juices and sportswear.

“Market demand remains very weak. I think one factor behind this is people believe less meat is healthier. This is a new trend,” said Pan Chenjun, executive director of food and agriculture research at Rabobank in Hong Kong.

Sales of vegetable-only dumplings grew 30 percent last year, compared with around 7 percent for all frozen dumplings, Nielsen research also shows.

“Demand for vegetable products keeps rising, giving us large room for growth,” said Zhou Wei, product manager at No. 2 dumpling producer Synear Food.

Some companies have been urgently changing the mix of products they sell, going for higher-margin pork meats rather than volume. Sales of traditionally less popular lamb and beef have also been increasing.(SD-Agencies)

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