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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
On a fool’s errand
    2017-June-26  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

A: Has Bill found a job?

B: Not yet. He went for an interview Friday, but he was on a fool’s errand. The job had already been filled.

Note: This idiom means to be involved in a useless journey or task. The description “fool” is now often used as a contemptuous insult, but in the Middle Ages it didn’t have such negative connotations. A fool then was a naive simpleton but regarded with respect and even admiration — somewhat the way that “the fool on the hill” is portrayed in The Beatles’ song. The idiom first appeared in the 18th century. Earlier, people would use another term: a sleeveless errand. From the Tudor era to around the 1700s, “sleeveless” was commonly used to mean “futile” or “trifling.”

 

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