-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Namibia, Land of the Brave
    2017-June-27  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

“Namibia, Land of the Brave” is the national anthem of Namibia.

The country is located on the west coast of southern Africa, with Zambia and Angola lying to the north, Botswana to the east, and South Africa to the south and east.

There are 10 major ethnic groups, including the “Basters,” who with other mixed-race (mainly Dutch and African) people constitute 8 percent of the population. By far the largest group is the Ovambo (nearly 50 percent), composed of a number of tribes of Bantu people. They are primarily Lutheran Christians, and their language — Oshiwambo — is spoken by over half of the country’s population. The 10 percent to 20 percent of Namibians who are not Christian hold indigenous beliefs.

English, Afrikaans (derived from Dutch), and German are some of the eight other recognized national languages. English education is compulsory in schools. The name of the country’s capital, Windhoek, may mean “wind corner” in Afrikaans.

As with most African countries, Namibia’s history can be divided into pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial periods. The country’s name derives from the Namib desert (possibly the world’s oldest), but in colonial times it was called German South-West Africa (1884-1915), then just South-West Africa when administered by South Africa (1915-1990).

Independence was gained in 1990 and, much like Azerbaijan, Namibia is a unitary semi-presidential republic. Their national motto, “Unity, liberty, justice,” is said to enshrine the principles stated in the young nation’s constitution.

This constitution is also one of the few in the world to include the protection of natural resources, aimed at “maintenance of ecosystems, essential ecological processes, and biological diversity of Namibia...” Thus, 18 percent of its land area is occupied by its numerous national parks and other protected areas.

This noble standard also helps promote tourism, which accounts for 14.5 percent of the nation’s GDP. Manufacturing, mining and agriculture are also major economic contributors. Visitors can see elephants, big cats, giraffes, rhinoceroses, zebras, monkeys and apes — all the usual African megafauna.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. are of little rainfall and sparse vegetation

2. put in a place of honor

3. land, forests, minerals, water, etc.

4. saying that expresses principles

5. required

6. land animals that are big enough to be seen unaided

7. lions, leopards, cheetahs, etc.

8. variety of living things

9. of a period of occupation by another country

10. native

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn