-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Tech and Science
VR goggles make facial paralysis patients feel better
    2017-July-12  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Facial paralysis* suffered by thousands of Britons is being treated by pioneering specialists with virtual reality (VR*) computer game-style technology.

The therapy could be used to help patients who find it too traumatic* to look at their own “changed” reflections after the paralysis.

The VR goggles encourage sufferers to carry out the regular facial exercises needed to regain muscle function with the wearer watching an avatar’s* face doing the exercises rather than their own.

VR goggles contain screens that sit next to the eyes. Images played on the screens immerse the user into a simulated* 3D world, which seems real.

Although most popularly used for computer games, one of the latest uses is in the treatment of facial paralysis, when the muscles in the face weaken, mainly as a result of temporary* or permanent* damage to the facial nerves.

This leads to paralysis of the affected part of the face, which can affect movement of the eyes, mouth and other areas.

The cause can be viral* or bacterial infection*, neurological* disease, stroke* or due to damage to the nerves after facial surgery.

Facial palsy* expert Charles Nduka, consultant plastic surgeon* at the Queen Victoria Hospital, is leading a trial into the new VR treatment which helps patients carry out facial physiotherapy* at home. He said: “Almost one in three who develop facial palsy could be helped by exercise.”

According to Nduka, daily physiotherapy is vital to “re-educate” damaged nerve fibers. The main problem is that patients have to look in a mirror to see if they are doing their exercises correctly, and many find gazing at their reflections so distressing that they fail to do the movements regularly enough.

“Visual feedback is vital to successful exercising. Now, facial sensors incorporated into VR goggles offer these patients an avatar – a 3D computerized representation of themselves – to look at instead. This will feed back to them in the same way as a mirror.

“Over the past 10 years we’ve found that patients who perform exercises regularly have better outcomes,” said Nduka.

The headset is fitted with 10 electrodes* that feed back how the muscles are moving in different parts of the patient’s face. As the patient frowns or smiles, the avatar’s face moves correspondingly.(SD-Agencies)

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn