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szdaily -> World
Lawmakers push to give terminally ill British baby US residency
    2017-July-13  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

TWO U.S. House Republican lawmakers are seeking to give permanent residency to Charlie Gard, the terminally ill British baby, and his parents if the London High Court allows the family to seek medical care in the United States.

The legislation, which the two Republicans said Tuesday that they would file, is the latest effort among high-profile international endorsements, including from U.S. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis, to help 11-month-old Charlie, who was discovered as a newborn to have a rare genetic condition.

Charlie’s parents want him to receive experimental medical treatment in the United States, but the London hospital where he has lived since October initially blocked his transfer on the legal grounds that it was not in the baby’s best interests because it would prolong his pain and suffering.

Last week, however, the hospital said it would reconsider its earlier decision to take Charlie off life support, and the High Court is expected to consider his case later this week.

The proposal by Representatives Brad Wenstrup, Republican of Ohio, and Trent Franks, Republican of Arizona, could apply only if the British court allows Charlie and his parents to seek treatment in the United States.

Giving the family lawful permanent status in the United States “would allow them to at least pursue their best hope for Charlie,” Franks wrote in an opinion piece published Tuesday by Fox News.

Charlie suffers from mitochondrial depletion syndrome, which saps the energy from his organs and muscles. Hospitals in the U.S. and in Italy have said they are prepared to treat the child with an experimental nucleoside therapy.

But the hospital and other experts say the treatment will not work on Charlie, who they say is suffering irreversible brain damage.(SD-Agencies)

 

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