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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Guyana: ‘South America, Undiscovered’
    2017-July-24  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

Situated on the north coast of the South American continent, Guyana is often considered part of the Caribbean because of its long connections to that community of islands. Its mainland neighbors include Brazil on the south and southwest, Venezuela to the west, and Suriname (formerly “Dutch Guiana”) to the east. French Guiana, an overseas department of France, lies further east.

Guyana used to be called British Guiana. The word “Guiana” (or Guyana) itself once applied to a much larger region that included parts of Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil. It’s a native word meaning “land of many waters.”

The fourth-smallest country in South America, Guyana was first colonized by the Dutch (as part of Dutch Guiana) before being taken over by the British in the 18th century. It gained independence, and took its modern name, in 1966. It is South America’s only officially English-speaking nation. Most people, though, speak a creole language based on English.

A presidential representative democratic republic, Guyana’s politics are at times volatile, with riots occurring after elections.

The people of Guyana are primarily Christian (over 57 percent), with over 28 percent being Hindu. Islam, Buddhism, and Rastafarianism--a relatively new religion that developed in Jamaica--are believed by most of the remainder.

The economy is primarily agricultural (especially rice and sugar), with mining, timber, and fisheries making up much of the balance.

When Americans hear “Guyana,” they might remember the “People’s Temple” incident. A cult led by American preacher Jim Jones had built a settlement named “Jonestown.” In 1978, over 900 of them committed mass suicide by drinking cyanide mixed with Kool Aid (a powdered drink mix). The phrase “to drink the Kool Aid” is still used, meaning to do something dangerous or foolish as a result of peer pressure.

This negative press may explain why Guyana receives only about 3,000 tourists a year. Those who do venture there enjoy spectacular forests and wildlife, old colonial architecture and considerable peace and quiet.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. violent public disorders

2. a language blended out of two other languages

3. an extremely poisonous chemical

4. make up, compose

5. false or extreme religious group

6. a large number of people killing themselves at the same time

7. a large amount of

8. the growing of trees for wood

9. industry of gathering fish

10. likely to become violent

 

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