-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
Poland’s President Duda vetoes judicial reforms after protests
    2017-July-27  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

POLISH President Andrzej Duda announced Monday he vetoed a controversial law to replace Supreme Court judges with government nominees.

Three key judicial reforms have been passed by Poland’s parliament, prompting days of demonstrations across the country.

Before they become law, they require approval by the president.

The changes have also set Poland’s right-wing government on a collision course with the European Union.

The European Commission had threatened to impose sanctions this week if the reforms were not scrapped. European Council President Donald Tusk, a former Polish prime minister, had warned of a “black scenario that could ultimately lead to the marginalization of Poland in Europe.”

“As president I don’t feel this law would strengthen a sense of justice,” Duda said in a statement broadcast on national television. “These laws must be amended.”

He said he was vetoing two of the new laws but approving a third, which gives the justice minister the right to name the heads of Poland’s lower courts.

The Law and Justice (PiS) government has strongly rejected claims that the reforms are a move towards authoritarian rule and has expressed disappointment at Duda’s decision to wield a veto.

Duda had already intervened last week in an attempt to find a compromise and his latest step came as a surprise.

He is himself a former member of the populist ruling party and he had already rejected a meeting on the crisis with Donald Tusk.

He said he had discussed the reforms at the weekend with legal experts as well as judges. The most influential voice, he said, was that of Zofia Romaszewska, a veteran dissident who told Duda she did not want to go back to the days when “the general prosecutor could do virtually anything.”

She was jailed during the years of martial law in the early 1980s but is now one of the president’s advisers. Romaszewska told Polish media it was completely out of the question for the attorney general to take charge of the Supreme Court.

Opposition MPs also praised the role of protesters in influencing the decision. Demonstrations have taken place in dozens of Polish cities, from Poznan and Lublin to Krakow, Gdansk and Warsaw, and there have been calls for the protests to continue.(SD-Agencies)

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn