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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle
Tai chi: a gentle way to fight
    2017-July-28  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Nan Nan

there_sun@163.com

COULD a small guy take down someone big and heavy? A tai chi master could.

Shenzhen Daily invited four readers on Sunday to experience tai chi, a traditional form of Chinese martial arts that has a long history and is the embodiment of Chinese philosophy.

Shi Haifang, a member of the Chinese Wushu Association, came first place at the World Tai Chi Health Congress for Wudang tai chi in 2014.

“Tai chi has two functions, one as a martial art used in combat and the other as a way to improve physical well-being,” Shi said, adding that today it’s largely practiced as a form of exercise.

“Chinese people believe one should avoid excess and there is always a way to shun direct confrontation,” he said.

Such is the idea behind the moves of tai chi. Instead of resisting an incoming force, tai chi proposes to meet it with softness and follow its motion until the incoming force of the attack exhausts itself or can be safely redirected.

He then taught a series of movements that can be used in self-defense and for improving physical well-being.

These simple movements can help stretch people’s muscles and even more importantly, they can help people to find inner peace. “This peaceful state of mind is my biggest reward of practicing tai chi for 10 years,” Shi said.

Portuguese Ana Cunha, who has seen people practice tai chi in parks, was surprised to learn that these seemingly effortless movements can be forceful and used in combat. British Lauren Clark enjoyed learning the different self-defense moves in case a need ever arises, while Israeli Roni Rahamim Gorodetsky found the philosophy of tai chi intriguing.

For beginners, like other sports, it’s important to practice tai chi regularly. In the long term, it will improve your overall health, Shi suggested.

“For those who want to learn more, they must find a qualified teacher. It’s difficult to change from one discipline of tai chi to another, so it’s important to stick to a teacher with a clear method.”

Those who practice tai chi learn routines, then practice in pairs. It’s also important for them to discuss theories and learn from each other. Not just a means, tai chi offers a philosophy and methodology, Shi said.

 

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