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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Sports
Zou Shiming: I don’t rule out retirement
    2017-July-31  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

JAPAN’S unheralded Sho Kimura stunned Chinese star Zou Shiming with an 11th-round knockout that saw the part-time restaurant worker snatch the WBO world flyweight title in Shanghai on Friday.

Zou burst into tears afterward and, at 36, the shock defeat could spell the end of a brilliant career, which also included two Olympic gold medals and three amateur world titles before he turned pro.

Zou, making his first defense of the World Boxing Organization (WBO) crown he won last year in Las Vegas, appeared well on his way to victory, using his experience to repeatedly make Kimura miss while peppering the challenger with counter-punches.

It looked grim for Kimura by the sixth round when Zou’s slashing left hook tore a gash next to the Japanese fighter’s right eye, forcing a temporary stoppage as the ring doctor examined the bloody cut.

Cheered on by an ecstatic home crowd, Zou continued to batter Kimura, 28, who works part-time delivering beer for a restaurant and was quoted last week devoting the fight to his late mother.

But the older man appeared to run out of juice as the scheduled 12-round bout wore on and Kimura kept piling forward.

The shocking upset was a bitter letdown for local fans and Zou, who was promoting the fight himself and chose his homeland for his first title defense as part of his aim to raise boxing’s profile in China.

“I have been boxing for 22 years. Why do I still stand here?” Zou told the stunned audience. “Although I lost, I drew attention to the boxing game to millions of people in China. I think it was worth it.”

“Many people still misunderstand the sport. I hope I can change their mind-set through my work. I don’t rule out retirement. But personally I don’t want to say goodbye.

“What I want is that one day, when I lose a fight and can not play any longer, China’s boxing will still be supported,” Zou added. (SD-Agencies)

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