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在线翻译:
szdaily -> China
China to be self-sufficient in organ transplants
    2017-August-8  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

CHINA is expected to be self-sufficient in organ transplants by 2030, an international expert said at a press conference on the sidelines of the China Organ Donation and Transplantation Conference on Saturday in Kunming, Southwest China’s Yunnan Province.

“My prediction is [that in] 2020, China will be number one in the world in number of organ donors, and in 2030, you can be self-sufficient,” said Martí Manyalich, president of the International Society For Organ Donation and Procurement, who has been involved in the training of around 500 organ coordinators in China during the past five years.

Facing a shortage of qualified transplant surgeons and hospitals, which has led to a waste of donated organs, China has vowed to train more doctors and increase the number of qualified hospitals from the current 173 to 300 by 2020.

The number of organ donors in China is expected to rise to around 5,000 this year from 34 in 2010 when the voluntary donation system was introduced, said Huang Jiefu, a former Chinese vice-minister of health and current head of the National Human Organ Donation and Transplant Committee.

Around 300,000 patients in China are in need of transplant surgeries every year but only 16,000 of them are estimated to be able to receive surgeries this year, said Huang.

Also at the meeting, international organizations, including The Transplantation Society (TTS), which once excluded Chinese surgeons from its membership and academic exchanges, have for the first time openly encouraged China’s involvement with global transplant activities and scientific exchanges at the conference.

“I have every confidence that the progress of reform will be sustained, and the objective of increasing the number of organs available for transplantation will be done equitably and fairly, and will be realized,” said Francis Delmonico, former president of TTS and a Harvard Medical School professor.

The change comes after China banned the use of organs from executed prisoners in 2015. The practice was misinterpreted by overseas groups that have fabricated baseless rumors against China, international experts said during a heated discussion at the Saturday press conference.

(SD-Agencies)

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