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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World Economy
Taking aim at China, India tightens power grid, telecom rules
    2017-August-21  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

INDIA is tightening the rules for businesses entering its power transmission sector and making stringent checks on both power and telecom equipment for malware — moves that government and industry officials say aim to check China’s advance into sensitive sectors.

Chinese firms such as Harbin Electric, Dongfang Electronics, Shanghai Electric and Sifang Automation either supply equipment or manage power distribution networks in 18 cities in India.

Local Indian firms have long lobbied against Chinese involvement in the power sector, raising security concerns and saying they get no reciprocal access to Chinese markets.

The Indian Government is considering a report prepared by the Central Electricity Authority (CEA) that sets new conditions for firms bidding for power transmission contracts, tipping the scales in favor of local companies.

According to an official involved in drafting the report, who asked not to be named, it said companies looking to invest in India should have been operating there for at least 10 years, have Indian citizens as top executives, and employees of the foreign firm should have lived in India for a certain period, the official said.

Those companies have to detail where they procure the raw materials for transmission systems, and will be barred from further operations in India if their materials contain malware.

Though the report makes no direct reference to China, the official said the recommendations are intended to deter China from making further headway in India.

A representative of a Chinese enterprise engaged in exporting electric power equipment in India told China’s Global Times that India’s industry has long tried to block foreign competition under the garb of safety issues.

“Now, as Sino-Indian relations are getting intense, the old tune is on again. But in fact, it is unrealistic to completely ban China and India power investment cooperation. India will pay a huge price for this,” the paper said.

The Indian Government is moving simultaneously on the telecom sector, demanding higher security standards in an area dominated by Chinese makers of equipment and smartphones.

The country’s ministry of electronics and information technology has asked 21 smartphone makers, most of them Chinese, to provide details about the “safety and security practices, architecture frameworks, guidelines, standards, etc followed in your product/services in the country.”

Chinese vendors such as Xiaomi, Lenovo, Oppo, Vivo and Gionee together account for over half of India’s US$10 billion smartphone market. The written request, dated Aug. 12, was also sent to Apple, Samsung Electronics and local maker Micromax, a government source said.

India has also privately raised objections to Chinese firm Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Group’s proposed US$1.3 billion takeover of Indian drugmaker Gland Pharma, it emerged last month.(SD-Agencies)

 

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