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Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Important news
Danish tourist’s life-and-death adventure in Shenzhen
    2017-August-24  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

AN Austrian doctor recently sent a text message to thank the medical staff in Shenzhen for saving the life of a Danish tourist, who suffered from multiple organ failure, after he arrived safely in Copenhagen, according to a post released by the city’s health authority.

The Danish tourist spent about five days in Guilin at the end of July. During his stay, he developed symptoms like mild asthma, cough, fever and diarrhea, and was treated at a Guilin hospital. However, when he was leaving for Hong Kong from Shenzhen on July 28, he experienced chest tightness, palpitations and shortness of breath, and was sent to the emergency room of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University (Luohu Hospital).

He was diagnosed with a malignant arrhythmia and could have gone into cardiac arrest at any time without timely treatment. The doctors considered the patient to be in critical condition with multiple serious complications, so they transferred him to the ICU.

At that point, the patient was on the brink of heart failure. Worse still, he was in both septic shock and cardiogenic shock, along with the malignant arrhythmia and multiple organ failure. The situation was paradoxical as septic shock required substantial fluid while cardiogenic shock restricted the influx of fluid to reduce the burden on the heart. Renal failure and urinary stress also aggravated the situation, so the ICU team seemed to be walking on a tightrope. After a series of rescues, the patient’s breathing gradually became smooth and his blood pressure was stable.

However, a new problem appeared. For patients with heart failure, urine is particularly important as it could save their life at a critical moment. But the Danish patient had no urine, and blood tests revealed that his renal function had deteriorated. His situation was trapped in a “vicious cycle.” Being unable to produce urine means the body is unable to discharge excess water, which is bound to aggravate heart failure, while worsening heart failure further affects the deterioration of renal function. The key to the treatment was to break this “vicious cycle,” so the ICU team decided to use CRRT (continuous renal replacement therapy) to fight the battle.

With the team’s careful treatment, the patient finally got off the ventilator, his trachea intubation was pulled out after 12 days of invasive mechanical ventilation and he regained consciousness Aug. 8. The patient’s urine gradually recovered.

After his condition became stable, his family contacted a special medical aircraft to transfer him back to Copenhagen on Aug. 18. The Austrian doctor who came to help the transfer gave the medical staff at Luohu Hospital a thumbs-up and said, “The technique was first-rate. The patient had come to the verge of death several times, but you managed to save him.”

The doctor sent the text message saying, “The Dane who has been saved wants to thank the efforts made by the ICU team from Luohu hospital. The multinational cooperation in medical transfer has made the patient come back to Copenhagen safe and sound.” (Zhang Yu)

 

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