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Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Important news
SRI LANKAN BOY RECOVERS WELL 2 YEARS AFTER SURGERY
    2017-August-25  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Zhang Yang

nicolezyyy@163.com

SITTING on a bed and eating a lollipop, a 5-year-old Sri Lankan boy identified as Dulen looks no different from other boys of his age. But back in 2014, he couldn’t even walk normally due to a rare disease.

The boy, who was born with two sets of genitals and two anuses, caught the attention of aid workers from Shenzhen who were visiting Sri Lanka three years ago. Sponsored by Shenzhen Hongfa Temple Charity Fund, Dulen came to Shenzhen with his family in 2014 and underwent multiple surgeries at the Shenzhen Children’s Hospital during his 224-day stay.

After thorough checks and rounds of discussions, the doctors at the hospital decided to jointly perform multiple surgeries at one time in order to reduce the pain and shorten the treatment time for the boy.

The major surgery March 1, 2015 lasted 14 hours and was a success. The boy has since been able to urinate and walk like normal, and his urinary and excretory systems are functioning well.

“The major surgery was complicated and it came with high risks and uncertainties. There hadn’t previously been a successful case of such a surgery in the world,” said Li Shoulin, chief physician of the hospital’s urology department. He said the success of the surgery provides valuable experience for the treatment of such diseases.

Dulen returned to his hometown in Sri Lanka after he was discharged from the hospital July 12, 2015. On July 12 this year, he revisited the hospital for a follow-up check.

The nurses pasted Dulen’s photos on the ward’s wall to welcome his return. Deng Zhimei, a nurse who attended to Dulen, said the boy had become more outgoing than two years ago. “He used to be shy and introverted due to his disease. Now he often sings and somersaults in front of us. It seems that he wants us to know he is recovering well,” Deng said.

According to Li, two minor surgeries were performed this time to repair Dulen’s indirect inguinal hernia and remove the scar contracture near his anus. Dulen is making a good recovery after receiving rehabilitation training and he no longer needs to undergo any more surgeries.

“We are so satisfied and delighted that we have a healthy child,” said Dulen’s mother.

Three years ago, the boy’s parents almost lost hope for seeking a treatment for Dulen. They even sold their houses and borrowed money from relatives and friends to hire Indian doctors to treat their son. However, Dulen’s situation couldn’t be improved because of the limited availability of medical care in Sri Lanka.

As the parents don’t speak Chinese, they had to communicate with the doctors and nurses in Shenzhen through an interpreter, Sam Fernando, a Sri Lankan living in Bao’an District.

Fernando volunteered to be an interpreter after seeing the family’s story on WeChat in 2015. He also visited Dulen’s home in Sri Lanka last year when he returned to the country. “What Dulen experienced in Shenzhen totally changed the family’s life. The family wouldn’t be able to afford the boy’s medical expenses if these warm-hearted people in Shenzhen hadn’t offered help to them,” he said.

 

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