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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle
Survey reveals the best timing for a day
    2017-August-25  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

THE best time to have sex is at 7:30 a.m. — around 45 minutes after you wake up, according to new research.

Energy levels are at their highest after a good night’s rest which means both sexes have more stamina.

The rush of endorphins sparked by sex lowers your blood pressure and stress levels and makes you feel more upbeat for the rest of the day.

The findings are from a survey by Forza Supplements, which asked 1,000 healthy and active people to report on the optimal times to engage in activities for their body clocks.

It also found that the ideal time for a run is just before — at 7 a.m. Experts say doing cardio exercise in a fasted state (i.e. before breakfast) leads to a small increase in the amount of fat being burned.

That is because blood sugar, insulin and glycogen levels are all lower than normal after an overnight fast.

Concentration levels peak around three hours after we have woken up, so it is best to save the most taxing jobs of the day at work for around 9:45 a.m.

Around an hour later, stress levels peak at 10:45 a.m. — most typically early in the week when our to-do lists are heaviest, so this is the best time to relax.

The best time for an alcoholic drink is 6:10 p.m. — what many would call “wine o’clock” — four hours before we go to bed to maximize the time for liver recovery.

The ideal for sleep is at 10:10 p.m. — allowing for 20 minutes to get to sleep and 90 minutes of the most restorative non-REM sleep which is most likely to occur prior to midnight.

The study also pinpointed the weak moments when we are most likely to put on weight by needing a sugar rush — or “snack o’clock.” This is at 3:30 p.m. — when we are starting to lag at work — and 8:15 p.m., when we are relaxing in front of the TV. So this is the best time to exercise your willpower.

The best times to eat breakfast is

7:15 a.m., lunch is 2:15 p.m. and dinner is 6 p.m. if you want to maximize weight loss, found the study.

The key to healthy eating was not to have an uneven calorie intake throughout the day, according to 72 percent of respondents.

The study also highlighted the optimum times of the day to work out.

Around half of those who took part (54 percent) found their calorie burn from running was best with pre-breakfast run at around 7 a.m.

Strength levels do build up during the day and 52 percent of gym fans who like to lift weights found they were most effective after work, with 6:30 p.m. being the favored time.

More than half (56 percent) felt they were not getting the optimum eight hours of sleep a night, and this was impacting on their effectiveness throughout the day.

Most people’s body clocks are broadly similar, but there is scientific evidence to back up some people’s beliefs that they are not a “morning person.”

Scientists have long known that we all have an individual chronotype — the main biological trait that explains why some people spring out of bed feeling alert while others struggle.

If you are a “night owl” type who rises later, experts suggest you could simply adjust the recommended timetable by how ever much later you wake up after the optimum time of 6:45 a.m.

So if you wake at 8:45 a.m., the rest of timetable should be two hours later with a bedtime of just after midnight.

Colin Espie, professor of sleep medicine at Oxford University, previously told MailOnline that people should not force themselves to become a morning person. He said, “It’s important for people to experiment and find the sleep pattern that feels comfortable.”(SD-Agencies)

 

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