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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
All Saints
    2017-August-30  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

This is a faith-based film that even atheists* will like. Steve Gomer’s drama about the mutually beneficial* relationship that develops between a small-town church and a group of Burmese refugees* doesn’t neglect its religious themes. But it mainly stresses the humanity of its characters and the importance of community ties. It does this in a manner that is never heavy-handed, making the true-life tale all the more inspiring*.

John Corbett plays the lead role of Michael Spurlock, who gave up a corporate sales career to become the pastor* of All Saints, a tiny church in Smyrna, Tennessee. His business experience made him ideally suited for his new position, since the church, whose congregation* was only in the double digits*, faced financial ruin. He had only two months before he’d be forced to close the church and see developers replace it with a big-box store.

But when a group of Karen refugees from war-torn Burma move into the community, Michael decides that the best way to both save the church and help the poor newcomers would be to turn the rich land surrounding the church into a farm.

Michael’s idea, which he says comes from divine inspiration, is met with skepticism* by many members of the community.

There are those who support the ambitious plan, among them Ye Win (Nelson Lee), one of the refugees who has extensive farming experience, and Forrest (Barry Corbin), an elderly church member who is against it. The plan proves very difficult to realize. To say that the story ends happily is not much of a spoiler*.

Although we don’t learn until the end credits that the film was shot using the actual church and several of its real-life congregants, it doesn’t come as a surprise considering how true it feels.

Corbett is charming as the small-town pastor who becomes revitalized by his newfound mission. Cara Buono (“Stranger Things”) is equally effective as Michael’s supportive wife, while Lee and Corbin provide solid support as two very different men who nonetheless bond* over their war experiences.(SD-Agencies)

 

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