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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
WWII bomb forces evacuation of 60,000 in Frankfurt
    2017-September-4  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

AT least 60,000 people were forced to leave their homes in central Frankfurt yesterday, as Germany begins an operation to defuse a huge unexploded World War II bomb dubbed “blockbuster.”

The operation is the biggest evacuation of its kind in post-war Germany, Frankfurt’s security chief Markus Frank said.

The 1.8-ton British bomb, which German media said was nicknamed “ Wohnblockknacker” — or blockbuster — for its ability to wipe out whole streets and flatten buildings, was discovered Tuesday during building works.

Police have since been guarding the bomb site, which is close to the city center and just some 2.5 kilometers north of the main Zeil shopping area.

Homes and buildings within a 1.5-kilometer radius of the site were due to be cleared.

The Westend district is home to many of Frankfurt’s top bankers, including European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi, who is known however to spend his weekends away from the German city.

Two major hospitals are also within the evacuation zone, including one with a big ward of newborns. Staff at the affected hospitals had transferred patients and infants to other medical centers Saturday.

The massive bomb in question is an HC 4000, a high capacity explosive used in air raids by Britain’s Royal Air Force during World War II.

Although police have said there is no immediate danger, the bomb’s massive size prevents them from taking any chances during the disarming process.

More than 70 years after the end of the war, unexploded bombs are regularly found buried in Germany, legacies of the intense bombing campaigns by the Allied forces against Nazi Germany.

(SD-Agencies)

 

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