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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Uruguay
    2017-September-4  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

Uruguay’s name is easily confounded with that of its neighbor, Paraguay. Though the etymologies of the names of both countries are uncertain, it seems that the common element — “guay” — may mean “river” or something to that effect.

At any rate, Uruguay is South America’s second smallest country (after Suriname), and has only about 3.5 million people, nearly half of whom live in the metropolitan area of Montevideo, Uruguay’s capital and largest city. It lies in the southeastern area of South America, and borders Argentina to the west, Brazil to the northeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. The southern border of the country, where Montevideo is located, lies on the mouth of the Rio de la Plata.

Though the Portuguese arrived in the area first in 1680, Montevideo was established by the Spanish in the early 18th century. By the early 19th, the country became independent after a struggle between the Old-World powers of Spain and Portugal, and South American countries Argentina and Brazil. The colonial powers still held sway, until the military became dominant in the 20th century.

Today, Uruguay is a democratic constitutional republic. Its president is both the head of state and the head of government. The country scores high among its South American neighbors in such measures as peace, prosperity, and the size of the middle class. It exports agricultural products, and generates a high percentage of renewable energy through its mostly hydroelectric facilities and wind parks.

The U.K.-based magazine The Economist named Uruguay “country of the year” in 2013, and its social policies are considered some of the most progressive in the world. The people speak Spanish, of course, and though nearly half are Catholic and 11 percent more are Protestant, Uruguay is the most secular country in Latin America, where over 40 percent profess no religion.

About that tourism slogan: Though spelled the same in both languages, “Natural” in Spanish has the accent on the last syllable. Also, in Spanish the adjective often goes after the noun. So in English the slogan might be “Natural Uruguay.”

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. able to be replaced

2. power made by running water

3. laws and regulations that affect the quality of human life

4. moving toward better conditions

5. had power (over)

6. piece, part

7. confused, mistaken for

8. end of a river

9. creates, makes

10. declare openly, affirm

 

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