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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Weekend
Busan Festival to Open With 'Glass Garden'
    2017-September-15  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

“GLASS Garden,” by Korean director Shin Su-won (“Madonna”) will open the 22nd edition of the Busan Film Festival, Asia’s largest film festival. “Love Education,” by multifaceted Taiwanese Sylvia Chang (“Murmur of the Hearts”) will close the festival, which runs Oct. 12-21.

The lineup announcement at two events earlier this week, the first in Busan, the second later in the day in Seoul, was the first official occasion jointly attended by festival director Kang Soo-youn and chairman Kim Dong-ho since they announced their planned resignation.

“I have managed to revise the regulation and host the festival’s latest edition normally. My work is done,” said Kim in Seoul. But he said he was unhappy with the pressure that has been heaped on Kang, who has been accused of being dogmatic and communicating poorly. “I cannot understand why Ms. Kang, who has led the festival well under adverse conditions, has to resign.”

“It is normal for the director to take full responsibility,” said Kang. “We still have ongoing issues, such as the film industry boycott — three organizations, including the director’s guild, have not yet lifted their boycott. I don’t think the situation will change dramatically in a short time. But I believe that there shouldn’t be any more doubts whether the BIFF will still go on. I will stay until this year’s edition wraps up.”

The lineup includes 298 films from 75 countries, and includes 100 world premieres and 29 international premieres. And one or two more titles may still be added.

“Glass Garden” is a story of an oddball bioenergetics researcher who studies artificial blood, and a mysterious novelist writing about her. “Love Education” metaphorically depicts China’s modern history through the lives of three women of three different generations.

This festival’s operating budget is bigger than for the previous edition’s. “Fortunately, we have managed to add US$424,000 to last year’s budget. Although the number of sponsors has decreased, the sum is the same as last year. We secured some funding from philanthropic foundations and also from the city council,” said Kang.

Kim said that despite the turmoil and the death of executive programmer Kim Ji-seok, the festival’s program and events will remain as strong as in previous years.

Four films will receive gala presentations this year, most of which hail from Japan: “Butterfly Sleep,” a South Korean co-production by Jeong Jae-eun; “Narratage,” a melodrama by Isao Yukisada; “The Third Murder,” a courtroom thriller-drama by Hirokazu Kore-eda; and one non-Asian title, “Mother!” by American helmer Darren Aronofsky (“Black Swan”) starring Jennifer Lawrence.

This year’s fest features a strong representation of North American documentary films, such as “Ex Libris: New York Public Library” by Frederick Wiseman, “Makala” by Emmanuel Gras and the South by Southwest (SXSW) grand jury prize winner “The Work” by Gethin Aldous and Jairus Mcleary.

In addition to Aronofsky and Lawrence who are slated to attend, Oliver Stone will be among international guests. The renowned director of “Platoon” and “Born on the Fourth of July” will head the jury of New Currents, Busan’s main competition section that is designed to introduce up-and-coming Asian filmmakers.

This year’s selection of 10 titles features many works hailing from China, including “End of Summer” by Zhou Quan (Chinese mainland), “One Night on the Wharf” by Han Dong (Chinese mainland), “Somewhere Beyond the Mist” by Cheung King-wai (Hong Kong) and The “Last Verse” by Tseng Ying-ting (Taiwan).

The fest will pay tribute to a champion of Asian cinema, Kim Ji-seok, head programmer and deputy director, who died in May. Organizers have introduced the Kim Jiseok Award in the Window on Asian Cinema section, and two films will receive the honor.

The festival will also honor late Japanese director Seijun Suzuki with its Asian Filmmaker of the Year award.

Suzuki churned out dozens of B-movies, many of them about yakuza gangsters, in the late 1950s and 1960s, infusing them with his own brand of quirky cinematic flair and comedy. The Japanese auteur has been cited as a major influence by various directors, including Quentin Tarantino, Wong Kar-wai, Bong Joon-ho and John Woo. He died in February this year at 93.

Platform Busan, a new networking program for Asian indie filmmakers that Kim had organized, will also be posthumously launched at the upcoming festival. The program, which will run Oct. 14-18, will offer regional filmmakers the chance to take part in seminars, forums and workshops. “We expect Platform Busan to bring new momentum to the film industries of Korea and other Asian countries,” said Kim. (SD-Agencies)

 

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