-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
惊不惊喜,意不意外
    2017-October-31  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

jīngbùjīngxǐ, yìbùyìwài

Meaning:

“惊喜” means “a pleasant surprise,” “意外” means “something unexpected,” “不” means “not,” and this structure used here is a typical rhetorical question in Chinese. Therefore, this catch phrase used by Chinese netizens today literally means: “Isn’t it a pleasant surprise? Isn’t it totally unexpected?” Often used jokingly, this indicates a twist has happened, perhaps hilarious or even embarassing. The saying first got recognized by the public in “All’s Well, Ends Well,” a 1992 Hong Kong comedy film. It was a line said by Stephen Chow’s character to Maggie Cheung’s character.

Example:

A: 你不是去北京出差吗?

Nǐ bùshì qù běijīng chūchāi ma?

Aren’t you supposed to go to Beijing on a business trip?

B: 北京大雾,航班取消了。惊不惊喜,意不意外?

Běijīng dàwù, hángbān qǔxiāo le。Jīngbùjīngxǐ, yìbùyìwài?

There’s a heavy fog in Beijing and the flight has been canceled. Isn’t that totally unexpected?

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn