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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Vatican City: seat of the Roman Catholic Church
    2017-November-2  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

Vatican City is unique among countries.

Aside from being the headquarters of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, it is the smallest country by area, squeezed into a mere 0.44 square kilometers within the city of Rome. It is less than a quarter the size of the next largest (tiny Monaco is 2 square kilometers). Perhaps related to this, with 800 residents it has the smallest population — primarily, clergy and security staff (these latter known as the Swiss Guards) — of any independent country.

The concept of “population” is actually rather convoluted where Vatican City is concerned. The law generally recognizes two principles of citizenship — jus sanguinis, meaning “the law of blood,” describes the child of a citizen, no matter where he or she is born; jus soli means being born on a country’s soil, no matter who one’s parents are.

But in Vatican City, one is a citizen according to jus officii, an “official” status related to one’s work. Therefore, when one changes jobs to one outside of Vatican’s system, one’s citizenship reverts to whatever it was before the appointment. If that person no longer holds any other citizenship, he or she becomes an Italian citizen upon completion of Vatican duties.

About 350 of Vatican City’s roughly 570 citizens lived beyond the walls as of March 2011, mostly posted in diplomatic missions around the world.

On the other hand, most of those residents inside Vatican City’s walls are not citizens of that state at all. This does not include the over 2,000 who come in daily to work from the outside, mostly Italian citizens. Italian is the language of the Vatican City government, as opposed to that of the “Holy See,” which is Latin.

The Holy See itself is another source of confusion. Vatican City has no sovereignty. The Holy See — the Church government — does. While the Holy See is ancient, Vatican City’s independence from Italy dates only to 1929. Its unique political structure means that the head of the Roman Catholic Church — the Pope — is essentially the King of Vatican City.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. independent, self-ruling position

2. offices representing a country

3. nation or other government entity

4. position, standing

5. twisted, complicated

6. main offices

7. fit tightly

8. global, all over the earth

9. bishops, priests, etc.

10. ideas, rules

 

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