-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Shenzhen
Woman bungles pilot’s course for son
    2017-November-8  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

A WOMAN in Futian District wanted her son to become a pilot and paid 800,000 yuan (US$120,827) for an overseas training program, only to find that it is not that easy, sznews.com reported.

In 2015, the woman surnamed Yao sent her son to the United States for a pilot’s license training program through an intermediary company. She thought her son would be able to join an airline company after he returned to China.

Yao said that her son was not good at English at the time she registered for the training program. After a period of studying English, the intermediary company sent Yao’s son to the United States, even though his English level had not reached the requirements. As her son was unable to communicate in English, his learning process began lagging behind.

A few days ago, Yao was told that because her son was learning very slowly, she needed to pay an extra US$10,000.

Yao said she had already made a one-time payment of 800,000 yuan for the tuition. She learned from her son that the American flying school would often suspend his lessons. Later she learned that the intermediary company had not paid the tuition on time as his fees in the United States were being charged according to class periods.

According to the intermediary company, the delay was partly due to personnel changes. Also, the courses were packed as more than 20 people were sent to study at the school by a large U.S. airline every month. Some students have graduated from the school and returned to China, so it was not entirely the company’s fault.

Yao also learned that the contents and requirements of the course packages provided by the intermediary company did not meet domestic standards. Even if her son had received the license, it would not have been usable in China.

Yao has demanded a refund for part of the tuition, and the intermediary company has said the issue would be negotiated.

(Zhang Yu)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn