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在线翻译:
szdaily -> China
Police seize 20 for trading in endangered species
    2017-November-9  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

MORE than 20 suspects have been caught for buying and selling endangered animals in East China’s Jiangsu Province, local police said yesterday.

The suspects were involved in buying and selling gibbons, macaques, lesser pandas, pythons and iguanas, according to Suzhou police.

In June, police began to suspect the owner of a local aquarium was trafficking endangered animals via contacts on the Internet.

“The owner of the aquarium was caught returning from a trip to Chengdu where he is thought to have purchased a lesser panda,” said Xu Youhong, a police officer in Suzhou Industrial Park.

“Macaques were sold for around 15,000 yuan

(US$ 2,300) each, and a lesser pandas at 40,000 yuan. An endangered gibbon was offered at more than one million,” said Chen Xi, deputy head of the industrial park police squad.

Also, a court in Jinan City, capital of Shangdong Province, has sentenced three people for smuggling 2,800 butterfly specimens into China, half of which are rare and protected species.

The three were given jail terms of five, seven and 10 years respectively, according to the Intermediate People’s Court of the city.

They were also ordered to pay fines ranging from 20,000 yuan to 50,000 yuan, the court said.

The case involved more than 1.5 million yuan and is believed to be the largest butterfly smuggling case uncovered by Chinese authorities.

According to the court, since October 2015, the three had purchased 2,800 butterfly specimens online from countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines, had them posted to China and framed before selling the specimens online at a profit.

Among the 2,800 butterflies, more than 1,200 are listed as protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and also under State protection in China. 

(Xinhua)

 

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