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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Papua New Guinea: a million different journeys
    2017-November-9  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

New Guinea is the name of both an island — located at the eastern end of Indonesia and north of eastern Australia — and a country, though the country is correctly called “Papua New Guinea.” The word “Papua” designates a people who occupy both sides of the island, as well as surrounding islands. Thus, the western half of the island of New Guinea comprises two provinces of Indonesia, called “Papua” and “West Papua.”

But Papua New Guinea — the eastern side of that same island — has gained its name as a result of colonial influences. Although the Spanish and Portuguese made contact as early as the 16th century (and dubbed it “New Guinea” because of the similarity of the people to those they had seen on the Guinea coast of west Africa), it wasn’t until the late 19th century that Germany and Britain laid claims to the eastern half of the island.

The northern half was “German New Guinea,” and the southern portion “British New Guinea.” Australia accepted oversight of the British portion from the motherland in 1905, when it became known as “Papua.” After WWI, the entire area was administered by Australia, and “German New Guinea” became simply “New Guinea.” Thus Australia was administering two separate, conjoined areas on the island: New Guinea in the north and Papua in the south.

After World War II, the area became the “Territory of Papua and New Guinea,” then “Papua New Guinea.” This colony became independent in 1975, and is now a Commonwealth realm, with a governor general representing the Queen of England, and a prime minister heading the cabinet.

Although Papua New Guinea has over 820 indigenous languages — 12 percent of the world’s total — English is the primary official language, along with Hiri Motu (a simplified form of a native island language called “Motu”) and Tok Pisin (“pidgin talk”), a creole of English which is the most widely spoken language in the country.

The economy is growing rapidly, due in part to a robust mining and resource sector. Papua New Guinea’s economy is still classified as developing.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. strong, vibrant

2. a cultural group, a “tribe”

3. a leader’s advisory council

4. named

5. a kind of pidgin that has become a native language

6. an artificial language made up of two or more others

7. said, “This is ours”

8. home country of one or more colonies

9. administrative power, supervision

10. united

 

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