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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Tech and Science
Balloons help people get back online
    2017-November-22  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Google’s parent Alphabet says its stratospheric* balloons have now helped more than 100,000 Puerto Ricans connect to the Internet.

The firm is working with AT&T and T-Mobile to successfully deliver basic Internet to remote areas of Puerto Rico where cellphone towers were knocked down by Hurricane Maria.

Two of the search giant’s Project Loon balloons are already over the country enabling texts, emails and basic web access.

The balloons were launched from Alpahbet’s site in Nevada, the United States, to Puerto Rico. Several more balloons are on their way from Nevada, and Google has been authorized by the Federal Communications Commission to send up to 30 balloons to serve the hard-hit area.

Project Loon head Alastair Westgarth said that the technology is still experimental, though it has been tested since last year in Peru following flooding there. “This is the first time we have used our new machine learning powered algorithms* to keep balloons clustered over Puerto Rico. As we get more familiar with the constantly shifting winds in this region, we hope to keep the balloons over areas where connectivity is needed for as long as possible.”

Project Loon balloons have flown more than 26 million kms around the world. “Thanks to improvements in balloon design and durability, many balloons stay airborne for more than 100 days, with our record-breaking balloon staying aloft for 190 days,” the firm said. (SD-Agencies)

 

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