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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
Wonder
    2017-November-29  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

This screen version of R. J. Palacio’s popular book is a kid-centric* drama, speaking directly to kids, while exploring their points of view. Writer-director Stephen Chbosky, who previously adapted his coming-of-age novel “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” to the screen, has a feel for the turning points that shape the tween* and teen years.

Tracing a milestone* year in the life of a boy who was born with craniofacial* differences, “Wonder” has an obvious antecedent* in Peter Bogdanovich’s deft 1985 feature “Mask,” but this is a less gritty middle-school tale. Chbosky aims to inspire, and he has harnessed* the considerable star power of his three leads to do that with humor and heart.

Jacob Tremblay plays Auggie Pullman, who at 10 has already been through 27 surgical procedures to correct his birth-defect facial abnormalities*. The cheerful, matter-of-fact display of Auggie’s hospital bracelets in his bedroom sets the tone for the movie: Medical ordeals* are the character-shaping backdrop to a story that looks forward, focused on resilience and transition.

Urged by his mother, Isabel (Julia Roberts), who has put her creative pursuits on hold while homeschooling him, Auggie is starting fifth grade at a local prep school. Though he’d never say it to his son, Auggie’s dad Nate (Owen Wilson) shares the boy’s worries, afraid that he and Isabel are sending a “lamb to the slaughter*.”

The horrors of schoolkid cliques* and bullies, led by a trust-fund brat* named Julian (Bryce Gheisar), await Auggie. But his principal (Mandy Patinkin) is a mensch, his homeroom teacher (Daveed Diggs) teaches him how to be a good person and his science teacher (Ali Liebert) encourages Auggie’s love of the subject.

The narrative is divided into chapters, each dedicated to the perspective of one of the young characters. First up is Auggie, who enters the fifth-grade fray* with the slouch* of someone who’d rather not face other people’s discomfort. His older sister, Via (Izabela Vidovic), gets a chapter, as do her former best friend, Miranda (Danielle Rose Russell), and Auggie’s new school buddy Jack (Noah Jupe). The film reveals the challenges they each face on the home front. Even Julian gets a redemptive* aha moment*. (SD-Agencies)

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