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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Budding Writers
Food — The great unifier
    2017-December-20  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Recently, comments on my posts on WeChat and Facebook suggest that food is the only subject I’m interested in. However, one can clearly see from a historical perspective that photos of food not only dominate my feed but also the newsfeeds of cultures since time began.

From the grapes of the Greek gods to the explosion of food TV, gastronomy has permeated our lives. Food unites people at settings ranging from major events, such as weddings and annual holidays, to smaller gatherings, as well as acting as an incentive for people to experience other cultures of both national and international prominence.

Spicy hot pot meals can provide a taste from Sichuan Province in Southwest China, as grits can give a culinary flavor of the southeast region of the United States. In essence, food is multidimensional, providing more than mere nutrition. Arguably, food not only unites people but it is the factor in which life itself revolves around.

My family in Albany, NY has kept a tradition, which my brother and sister continue to follow, in which Sundays are the day the family gathers for an early dinner to celebrate and share life together. I distinctly recall my dad on the back porch, tending to the grill as a roast beef was rotating on the rotisserie.

It’s a true form of art to be able to barbecue various cuts and samples of meat to perfection and my dad was the master. As the smoke tantalized our taste buds, my mom and siblings pitched in with side dishes and kitchen duty. On Sundays, it was also the time to acquaint and befriend my aunts, uncles, cousins and neighbors. The tasty contributions from my aunts, which include a green bean salad, potato salad, as well as ambrosia, are still part of a regular repertoire during family gatherings today. Food brings us closer.

Food allows people to experience fragments of another culture. Having lived in Japan for almost a decade, work revolves around social events featuring food and drinks, from elegant sushi to multiple-course meals.

In China, few business events involve such culinary delights or any food at all since the Chinese do not see the value in these Western-style traditions; however, this does not deter one from building social events around spectacular Chinese cuisine.

Rhetorically speaking, is there any better method for building relationships with coworkers or students than to enjoy dishes from different regions of the country together? When a student asks if I ever tried specific dishes from a certain region of China, the answer is invariably no and soon we are making plans to share this dish together.

After living in South China for a year, I’ve experienced a healthy dose of both local and non-local cuisines from many regions of this diverse and large country, from barbecue and fish soup made with rice noodles to pork wonton soup and beef hot pot.

All dishes are as intriguing as they are flavorful. As my Sunday dinners featured family and food in a relaxing and fun environment, so do my dinners in China, since I’m enjoying the comfort foods of another culture with some fine, intelligent folks whom I call my friends.

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