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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Shenzhen
Hospital conducts intraoperative wake-up test
    2018-January-10  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

COUNTING from one to 10 is a simple action for many people, but what if it’s a patient who is undergoing a brain operation? A hospital in Shenzhen recently carried out its fourth intraoperative wake-up test during an operation to remove a brain tumor while avoiding damaging the patient’s major brain nerves, sznews.com reported yesterday.

The Eighth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University in Futian District has successfully completed the rare operation, where a doctor wakes up the patient during the brain surgery to conduct tests that preserve the patient’s language and motor functions.

According to the report, only a handful of large-scale hospitals in China are able to conduct such a test during brain surgery.

The patient was a 46-year-old resident. An egg-sized tumor was found in the left part of his brain a few months ago and he needed to undergo brain surgery to remove the tumor.

However, doctors from the neurosurgery department found that the tumor was very close to the areas that control the patient’s speech and motor abilities. If they had adopted the traditional method to remove the tumor, the patient might have suffered from serious speech or movement disorders following the surgery.

Professor Chen Jianliang, the chief doctor at the department, decided to conduct the brain surgery while the patient was in a waking state so that the patient could cooperate with the doctor by answering questions or making gestures to show Chen that his brain was functioning.

Chen said that the anaesthetic was only injected into the patient’s scalp and meninx. The patient was kept awoken during the operation to respond to the doctor’s simple questions. By talking to the patient, Professor Chen was able to avoid cutting areas that might cause disabilities.

It took Chen a few hours to finish the surgery and the patient’s tumor was removed completely without any damage to the areas that control his speech and motor functions.

There are some tell-tale symptoms of brain tumors, according to Professor Chen.

He reminded residents to consult doctors if they suffer from serious headaches, especially in the morning, and blurred vision.

(Zhang Qian)

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