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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
The Red Turtle
    2018-January-10  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

《红海龟》

A fable where man bonds with nature in some mysterious ways, “The Red Turtle” marks the feature debut of Dutch-British illustrator and animator Michael Dudok de Wit, whose short film “Father and Daughter” won the Academy Award back in 2000.

Co-produced by Studio Ghibli, the influence of its founders Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata is very much apparent* in the film’s exquisite* use of line and color, not to mention its shape-shifting* story of family, survival and paradise regained.

Without dialogue, the film tells the story of an unnamed man who washes ashore on a tiny island and finds himself fighting the natural elements as he tries to make it out alive.

Like Tom Hanks in “Castaway,” the man tries to build a raft* that will take him out to sea. Except that each time, a hidden underwater creature keeps thwarting* his escape. Soon we learn that the assailant* is the red turtle of the film’s title, and, just as our hero manages to attack it, leaving the giant turtle to die on the beach, it suddenly undergoes an unexpected transformation*.

That’s the biggest surprise in Dudok de Wit’s otherwise simple story, which goes on to imagine the harmonious* life of the man, and now a mysterious woman, who live on the island like the two lovebirds in “The Blue Lagoon.”

Most of the film’s latter half depicts a simple lifestyle that’s only met by a few hurdles* — including a vivid tsunami* — as time carries on and the couple creates a universal human experience in their own paradise.

While the plot can sometimes feel too lightweight for feature length, “The Red Turtle” benefits from the beautiful animation work of Dudok de Wit and his team, which includes Takahata (“The Tale of Princess Kaguya”) as creative producer and Jean-Christophe Lie (“The Triplets of Belleville”) as supervising animator.

The Dutch-born director has always been inspired by classic ink and watercolor paintings from China and Japan. His 1994 Oscar-nominated short, “The Monk and the Fish,” is a perfect example — and here he manages to bring those drawings to life, in a fable that takes on the calm aesthetic* of a seaside reverie*.(SD-Agencies)

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