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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Campus
Folk artists see potential in handicapped kids
    2018-January-10  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

非遗大师元平特校收弟子

Delicate cloisonne ware, miniature sculptures and vivid images stitched in Suzhou-style embroidery were among around 100 folk art pieces on display at Shenzhen Yuanping Special Education School recently.

Cloisonne ware, also called jingtailan (Jingtai blue ware) in Chinese, is an ancient technique for decorating metalwork objects that originated in Egypt and Europe and spread to China in the 13th and 14th centuries. The most elaborate and highly valued Chinese pieces are from the early Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), especially from the reigns of the emperors Xuande and Jingtai. In Chinese cloisonne, blue is the predominant color, giving rise to the name.

Suzhou embroidery, with a history dating back 2,000 years, is famous for its beautiful patterns, elegant colors, variety of stitches and consummate craftsmanship.

It takes a lot of time and meticulous training to master these traditional crafts, and handicapped students have passed muster after just one year’s learning.

In September 2016, a traditional Chinese handicraft program was launched at the school, offering students courses in five traditional crafts. More than 50 enrolled and learned to make cloisonne, miniature sculptures and micro-engravings, Suzhou embroidery, inner painting (painting on the interior surface of glass bottles with pictures and calligraphy) and bamboo weaving.

Inner painting master Zhang Rucai, Suzhou embroidery master Yao Qinhua and several other intangible cultural heritage (ICH) craftsmen took in six students to be their proteges and gave each tool kits as gifts.

The folk art teaching program was endorsed by local education authorities. “This program helps carry on traditional Chinese culture. At the same time, it teaches handicapped kids skills that may help them make a living in the future,” said Zhao Li, a senior education officer.

The school for special children offers a rich curriculum in art education, including courses in painting, pottery, animation and computer-aided design.

(Debra Li)

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