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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero
    2018-January-31  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Dubai’s first animated feature puts top-class artwork to use in a story aimed to preach* about the inclusive, nondiscriminatory* aspects of the Muslim faith to younger audiences. Loosely based on the life of Bilal ibn Rabah, a companion of the Prophet who was born a slave and became the first muezzin* (the man who calls the faithful to prayer), “Bilal” avoids any immediate controversy* by only vaguely mentioning Mohammed, instead emphasizing* the socially just origins of the religion.

In the late sixth century, a loving Abyssinian mother is killed by evil marauders* as her young children Bilal (voiced by Andre Robinson) and Ghufaira watch from a closet. The invaders take the kids to Mecca, where they’re enslaved by wicked seller Umayya (Ian McShane), whose son Safwan (Sage Ryan) is even worse than his father.

Despite lessons learned at his mother’s knee, about how living without the interior chains of anger, vengeance* and superstition* makes a man great, the adult Bilal (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) grows accustomed to the hopelessness of captivity*. Then he meets Hamza (Dave B. Mitchell), who tells him no one is born a slave. Inspired by these words, Bilal is able to regain a sense of dignity*, and as the teachings of equality, non-discrimination and monotheism* sink in, he joins forces with the Prophet’s followers to battle against the wicked ones.

And battle they do, in bloody fights with galloping warriors riding horses with red eyes. It’s true that the early years of Islam were full of tribal and religious warfare, so one could argue that the pic’s general atmosphere has some truth. Yet for a children’s film, the violence is too much.

The anti-capitalist message adds an interesting twist, depicting Mecca’s merchants as money-grasping slave owners whose only real god is Mammon*.

Visuals are well designed in terms of both the characters and the landscapes.

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