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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
US considering sanctions on Venezuela
    2018-February-6  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

THE United States is considering imposing sanctions on Venezuela that could cripple its oil industry and is probing whether the plan would be supported in the region, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday in Argentina.

Tillerson and his Argentine counterpart, Jorge Faurie, also said in a news conference that their countries had agreed to work together to combat fund-raising in Latin America by the militant group Hezbollah, a rare acknowledgment of the Middle Eastern group’s active presence in the region.

Tillerson was in Argentina midway through a five-nation diplomatic swing through Latin America and the Caribbean. He will meet with Argentine President Mauricio Macri before continuing to Lima, Peru.

Throughout the trip, Tillerson has sought to rally regional support for a widening campaign to put pressure on the leftist government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. Many leaders in the hemisphere as well as human rights organizations accuse Maduro of trampling on democracy and sending his nation into a humanitarian and economic crisis.

The United States has imposed sanctions on more than 50 Venezuelan officials and businesses in hopes of isolating Maduro, and several countries in the region have joined or applauded the efforts.

But taking the next step — banning sales of Venezuelan oil in the United States and halting refining of Venezuelan crude by U.S. companies — is more complicated because of the potential harm to the already suffering Venezuelan people as well as to American businesses and neighboring countries that depend on Venezuelan oil.

“Is it a step that might bring this to an end, to a more rapid end, to a more rapid close,” Tillerson said of the Maduro government’s actions, “because not doing anything to bring this to an end is also asking the Venezuelan people to suffer for a much longer time.”

Faurie also expressed caution. “We should closely follow up on this to ensure an appropriate balance between what the Venezuelan nation needs and what is being used by the leaders of the Venezuelan Government” to enrich themselves, he said.

Several Latin American and Caribbean countries such as Colombia have been reticent to cut off Venezuela’s oil revenue but at the same time have expressed frustration that sanctions and talks so far have had little impact. (SD-Agencies)

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